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Curdled oil found at Vung Tau beaches in southern Vietnam, again

Beaches in Vung Tau, the seaside city of the southern province of Ba Ria-Vung Tau, are covered with tons of clots of curdled oil that appears as an annual phenomenon whose cause has yet to be identified.

Beaches in Vung Tau, the seaside city of the southern province of Ba Ria-Vung Tau, are covered with tons of clots of curdled oil that appears as an annual phenomenon whose cause has yet to be identified.
Beaches in Vung Tau, the seaside city of the southern province of Ba Ria-Vung Tau, are covered with tons of clots of curdled oil that appears as an annual phenomenon whose cause has yet to be identified.

The oil clots began to drift to the seashore of the province, from Vung Tau to Xuyen Moc District, on Monday morning, local authorities reported.

Efforts to collect the curdled oil to protect the sea environment and minimize negative impacts on tourism have since been carried out by competent agencies.

By Monday afternoon staffers of tourist areas and beaches in Vung Tau, and the Vung Tau City Urban Environmental Service Joint Stock Company, had collected dozens of tons of curdled oil by using shovels, rakes, and bags.

According to a survey of the provincial Environmental Protection Sub-Department, most of the curdled oil has been found at Bai Sau Beach in Vung Tau and Nuoc Ngot Pass in Dat Do District of the province.

This image shows bags containing clots of curdled oil collected from beaches in the southern province of Ba Ria-Vung Tau on March 2, 2015.

Circled oil clots have also appeared, though in less abundance, in the Trai Nhai area of Vung Tau, Loc An fishing port, and some coastal tourism areas in Long Dien, Dat Do and Xuyen Moc Districts.

According to the Department of Natural Resources and Environment of Ba Ria-Vung Tau, the oil clots, as hazardous waste, cannot be re-used and must be collected for destruction.

The appearance of curdled oil along the coast of the province has taken place each of the past several years, usually during March and April, when the wind changes its direction from northeast to southwest.

However, the cause of this phenomenon has yet to be identified, the Sub-Department said.

On Monday, the department asked the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment to assist it in working out the cause.