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The week in wildlife – in pictures

Kiangs – wild asses – in Qiangtang nature reserve, Tibet. The kiangs are the largest of the wild asses species and native to Tibet. Photograph: Purbu Zhaxi/Corbis
Kiangs – wild asses – in Qiangtang nature reserve, Tibet. The kiangs are the largest of the wild asses species and native to Tibet. Photograph: Purbu Zhaxi/Corbis
A black ant walks on a Canna Flower after a brief spell of rain in New Delhi, India, 03 July 2014.
A black ant walks on a canna flower after a brief spell of rain in New Delhi, signalling a much awaited monsoon in India. Photograph: Harish Tyagi/EPA
Capybara family members enjoy the sun in Brazil's Pantanal region. Capybaras are closely related to guinea pigs but weigh in at around 55 kg and grow up to a metre long. The whole wetland is almost as big as the UK and spreads more than 195,000 square kilometres across Brazil, Bolivia and Paraguay.
A capybara family bask in the sun in Brazil’s Pantanal region. Capybaras are closely related to guinea pigs but weigh at about 55kg and grow up to a metre long. Pantanal wetland is as big as the UK, spread over 195,000 sq km across Brazil, Bolivia and Paraguay. Photograph: Paul Williams/R
A Macroscelides micus elephant shrew found in the remote deserts of southwestern Africa is shown in this handout photo from the California Academy of Sciences released to Reuters on June 26, 2014. The new mammal discovered in the remote desert of western Africa resembles a long-nosed mouse in appearance but is more closely related genetically to elephants, a California scientist who helped identify the tiny creature said on June 26, 2014. The new species of elephant shrew inhabits an ancient volcanic formation in Namibia and sports red fur that helps it blend in with the color of its rocky surroundings, said John Dumbacher, one of a team of biologists behind the discovery. Genetic testing of the creature   which weighs up to an ounce (28 grams) and measures 7.5 inches (19 cm) in length, including its tail   revealed its DNA to be more akin to much larger mammals.
Macroscelides micus is a new elephant shrew species discovered in west Africa desert. It resembles a long-nosed mouse but is more closely genetically related to elephants and inhabits ancient volcanic formation in Namibia. It weighs 28 grams and is 7.5 inches long, with red fur that helps it blend in with the rocks. Photograph: Reuters
a mantis shrimp as they can view their underwater world in a whole new light, seeing ultraviolet (UV) colours far beyond the range of human vision, scientists have learned,  July 3, 2014. The creatures' bulging eyes contain built-in filters made from a biological sunscreen used by other marine animals to shield themselves against UV rays.
A mantis shrimp’s underwater vision is superior to humans. It can see ultra violet colours. The shrimp’s bulging eyes contain natural filters made from a biological sunscreen that shield against UV rays, a feature found in most marine animals. Photograph: Michael Bok/PA
A Lemonpeel Angelfish (Centropyge flavissima) observed at Henderson Island while on a National Geographic Pristine Seas expedition to the Pitcairn Islands in 2012.
A lemonpeel angelfish (Centropyge flavissima), spotted at Henderson Island, is part of a unique marine ecosystem discovered by the National Geographic Pristine Seas expedition to the Pitcairn Islands. Photograph: courtesy of Enric Sala/NG/Pristine Seas
larger hairy armadillo (Chaetophractus villosus), Brazil, Pantanal
A larger hairy armadillo (Chaetophractus villosus) in Pantanal, Brazil. The armadillo is the mascot for Fifa World Cup in Brazil – it’s animated avatar has made millions, but the real animal faces extinction. Photograph: Blickwinkel/Alamy
U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon sits in a tour van as he prepares for a drive through the Nairobi National Park
UN secretary general Ban Ki-moon sits in a tour van as he prepares to drive through the Nairobi national park after concluding his two-day official visit during which he addressed the first UN Environment Assembly in Kenya’s capital Nairobi. Photograph: Eskinder Debebe/UN Photo
On the 30th of June the DSWT Nairobi HQ received a call from Mark Goss in the Masai Mara requesting the DSWT funded Sky Vet team to attend to two speared elephant bulls.
Vets treat a bull elephant speared by poachers in Masai Mara national reserve in Kenya. Photograph: David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust
Photo released by explore.org, a bird flies over an owl at the site of the explore.org live camera set up in Barrow, Alaska. A high-definition camera trained on a burrow near the nation's northernmost city is allowing researchers and any bird viewer with an Internet connection an unfettered view into the nesting den of an Arctic snowy owl.
A bird flies over an Arctic snowy owl in Barrow, Alaska. Explore.org’s high-definition camera trained on a burrow in the field is allowing researchers and bird lovers unfettered view of the snowy owl’s nesting den. Photograph: Tiffany Sears/AP
Wild poppies bloom at Blackstone Farm Fields, managed by Worcestershire Wildlife Trust, on July 1, 2014 in Bewdley, United Kingdom. As the centenary of World War One approaches on 4 August, the popular Flanders Poppy will be at the centre of attention as the iconic symbol of remembrance blooms across Europe.
Wild poppies bloom at Blackstone Farm Fields, managed by Worcestershire Wildlife Trust, in Bewdley, UK. As the centenary of first world war approaches on 4 August, the popular Flanders Poppy will be at the centre of attention as the iconic symbol of remembrance blooms across Europe. Photograph: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images
A whitetail deer bounds through a field of ripening wheat near Walla Walla, Wash., Tuesday afternoon, July 1, 2014. The wheat harvest has just begun in a few fields in eastern Washington.
A whitetail deer bounds through a field of ripening wheat near Walla Walla, Washington, US. Photograph: Greg Lehman/AP
One of many fishnets on the reefs of St. Vincent
One of many fishnets on the reefs of the island country of St Vincent and Grenadines. El Niño this year is likely to cause widespread damage to the world’s coral reefs. Photograph: Catlin Seaview Survey/IUCN
A bee flies over a blooming lotus flower in Tangshu Village on June 28, 2014 in Shucheng, China.
A bee flies over a blooming lotus flower in Tangshu village in Shucheng, China. Photograph: Barcroft Media
A handout photo taken on June 20, 2011 and released on June 22, 2011 shows an Emperor penguin in New Zealand, some 3,000 kilometres (1,900) from his Antarctic home. Global warming will send Antarctica's emperor penguins into decline by 2100, scientists projected on June 29, 2014, and called for the emblematic birds to be listed as endangered and their habitat better protected.
An emperor penguin in New Zealand, some 1,900 miles from its Antarctic home. Global warming will send Antarctica’s emperor penguins into decline by 2100, scientists predict in a study. It calls for the emblematic birds to be listed as endangered and their habitat better protected Photograph : Richard Gill/AFP/Getty Images
A great white shark swims near the surface in Mossel Bay, South Africa.
A great white shark swims near the surface in Mossel Bay, South Africa. Great white sharks often poke their heads above the surface to survey the waters. In Western Australia they face a cull, a move campaigners say will damage the ocean ecology. Photograph: Dale Morris/Barcroft Media
A wild snow leopard is seen in Changtang Nature Reserve, on July 2, 2014 in southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region.   A wild animal research team organized by local forestry bureau here were lucky to catch a chance to snap shot of a wild snow leopard.
A wild snow leopard in Changtang nature reserve in Tibet. Sightings of the elusive animal are very rare. Photograph: Barcroft Media
A pollinating moth Manduca sexta, this one with a wing span of about 4 inches, feeds from a Sacred Dutura, or Datura wrightii, flower while flying through a wind tunnel at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington in this May 2014 picture provided by Kiley Riffell. The  moths, whose olfactory abilities are as good as a bloodhound's and vastly better than a human's, can fly up to 80 miles (130 km) a night searching for their favorite flowers like the Sacred Datura.
A pollinating moth Manduca sexta, feeds from a sacred datura (datura wrightii) flower while flying through a wind tunnel at the University of Washington in Seattle. The moths, whose olfactory abilities are as good as a bloodhound’s, can fly up to 80 miles a night searching for their favorite flowers. Photograph: Kiley Riffell/Handout/Reuters
Tourist look at empty docks which were homes to hundreds of sea lions that disappeared from Pier 39 in San Francisco, California, USA, 30 June 2014.  The city's famous colony of sea lions disappeared once before in 2009. Like then, hundreds of sea lions were lying about in the sun, and barking one day, and without notice they were gone the next day. Scientists believe the sea lions went south to breed.
Tourists look at empty docks once home to sea lions that disappeared from Pier 39 in San Francisco, California, US. The city’s famous colony of sea lions disappeared once before in 2009. Like then, hundreds of sea lions vanished in a day without a trace. Scientists believe they are headed south to breed. Photograph: John G. Mabanglo/EPA